About your Search

20130201
20130228
STATION
CSPAN 6
MSNBCW 4
MSNBC 3
CSPAN2 2
CNN 1
CNNW 1
LANGUAGE
English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
senator from a red state, a decorated and wounded combat veteran nominated to lead the pentagon while we are at war. republicans have never before felt the need to filibuster a cabinet member in the history of the country but apparently now this is the time and this is the guy worth waiting 224 years to spring it on. it has never happened before, but why not now? heck. the white house is not pleased. "today's action runs against both the majority will of the senate and our nation's interest. this waste of time is not without consequence. we have 66,000 men and women deployed in afghanistan, and we need our new secretary of defense to be a part of significant decisions about how we bring that war to a responsible end. next week in brussels, the united states will meet with our allies to talk about the transition in afghanistan at the nato defense ministerial, and our next secretary of defense should be there. for the sake of national security, it's time to stop playing politics with our department of defense and to move beyond the distractions and delay. allow this war hero an up or down
news. it is bad news on the domestic side and on the pentagon side. and it's not to be taken lightly on the domestic side. every single program that people count on is going to be cut across the board, 13%. >> that's social security. >> that's medicare. >> that's medicaid. >> that's headstart. >> that's -- it's -- it is so bad that the congressional budget office said: this sequester will take us not right away but probably by the end of the year from recovery into recession. back into recession. so this thing, here you go, you do this. the economy is going to tank. i was in the briefing room friday at the whitehouse when secretary ray lahood came in secretary of transportation, ray lahood, talking about just one other aspect of that, of the sequester that we can expect and that is in air travel. the secretary mentioned they have no flexibility in this. they have to cut so much and the only wake they can cut with so many employees they've got is to make -- is to require some of them to take a furlough. most of their employees are air traffic controllers.
103 different stem -- science, technologies, engineering and math -- programs within the pentagon alone. consolidating those would save $1.7 billion over the next ten years. these are programs that are not necessarily initiated by congress, by the way. so they do have the flexibility to make those changes. department of defense tuition assistance program totally duplicates our veterans tuition assistance program. so you can do in service have this access to tuition while in service and then have the identical tuition access afterwards and you can claim them both. there's nothing wrong with wanting togy an educational benefit to our troops, but we don't need to do it twice. that's a significant savings of $4.5 billion. alternative energy. we have a department of energy. their whole goal is to work on alternative energy and renewable energy and efficiency within energy. the department of defense is spending $700 million a year on research in alternative energy that totally duplicates everything we're doing everywhere else. so there's $00700 million that we should not be spending at
with a balanced approach to new revenue and necessary pentagon cuts and it creates jobs all over the country. it equalizes the cuts we've already made with revenue by closing tax loopholes for america's wealthiest individuals and corporations. but we shouldn't just sacrifice our economic recovery because republicans are unwilling to vote for one single penny and new revenue, new contributions from their billionaire friends and corporations. we have to look at what these cuts mean in the sequester. the sequester involves 70,000 children being kicked off of head start. no one in this chamber disagrees about the importance of head start. early childhood education is absolutely essential in creating the foundation for learning in children all over the world. and that's what head start is about. 70,000 american children being kicked off head start. that's what happens when you use a meat cleaver instead of a scalpel. we're talking about more than a million kids who will see their schools lose education funding. we're talking about emergency responders who will lose their jobs, meaning slower resp
federal government except the pentagon. all of a sudden the last couple of months hitting this arbitrary political target is vital. what is vital, as i said, is having a deficit strategy that's consistent with sound economic growth and making sure that we strengthen the middle class and that means as a first step to make sure that our deficits, as the economy improves, as we grow, that our deficits are not growing faster than g.d.p. and that we stabilize the debt as a percentage of g.d.p. because if you don't, as the economy improves, higher government borrowing -- we need to adopt that strategy and adopt it now. have it kicked in over a period of time. we just got very good news that the rate of per capita increase in health care costs is actually at the lowest level of 50 years. we need to continue to adopt strategies to keep that -- those costs increase low. as as demographic changes means baby boomers retire and we clearly need to keep working on those issues. but let me just sum up where we are in terms of our deficit reduction targets. over the last little over two years we have no
at the pentagon. hagel said he was honored to be the new defense secretary and that the pentagon does have a tough road ahead of it including dealing with sequestration. >> we need to deal with this reality. we've got ahead of us a lot of challenges. they are going to define much of who we are. not this institution only but our country. >> meantime, we do have major developments on the sequester issue today. the white house is saying that president obama will hold a meeting on friday with top congressional leaders on both sides including speaker boehner, nancy pelosi, harry reid, and mitch mcconnell. you would think maybe he could grab them on the side of the rosa parks statue right now and bring this up. they're all together. so it's the first time in years, though, this year that the president has a face-to-face meeting with republican leaders where they will directly discuss sequestration. i say again he's right there. this is a good moment. they're all applauding. why not talk about it now? we bring in today's political power panel. what do you think? why not talk about it now? can we put the
and the u.s. is taking the test very seriously. let's bring in barbara starr. live at the pentagon. this test is wore i sor woresom. >> one of the biggest problems right now is whether or not north korea really has achieved a miniaturid bomb. they say they set off a smaller, more lethal explosive, if you will. miniaturization is key. that means they could possibly put a small war head on a missile sooner than expected and deliver it to a target. now the cia, pentagon, all has to look at this to determine what they set off and essentially now work backward. if it was a miniaturized bomb, what did it take north korea to get there? where did they get the technology, the engineering, the expertise, the money to do it? they will look at what it would have taken north korea to achieve what they say they achieved and try to figure out how they did it and who might have helped them. zoraida. >> has theyou say there. there has been of skepticism in where this program is right now. >> the u.s. has been skeptical for years. in december, they successfully launched a long-range ballistic missil
secretary in a private ceremony with family members and immediate office staff at the pentagon. he later spoke to folks at the pentagon. we'll show that to you later in our program schedule. the supreme court today heard testimony in a case regarding the voting rights act of 1965. "the new york times" reporting on the oral argument today saying a central provision of that voting rights act could be in peril judging from rough or tough questioning today from the supreme court's more conservative members. they write that the law, a landmark achievement of the civil era, was challenged by shelby county, alabama, which said the requirement outlived its usefulness. we spoke about the oral argument today on "washington journal." host: the supreme court hears a case about the voting rights act today and here to talk about with us is ari berman, contributing righter at the nation. and hang von, at the heritage foundation, thank you to you. before we get into the specifics what the supreme court is hearing today,ary, tell us about the voting rights act and its history. >> it was put into place be
was the police chief in arlington, virginia. that is where the pentagon was. what i learned that day is if this country >> now i wondered in the last decade how many people have to get murdered in a mass murder for it to be enough? i've been wrong time after time after time. i'm a grand pap i have little kids at home. are 20 babies be enough. that's what we're asking for? when was that gun bought? [applause] >> i'm a law enforcement guy too. i had your job in connecticut some years ago. i want to say, nobody in law enforcement ever thinks we're doing enough. nobody ever says we can go home and stop trying to to do better. so as much as we may agree with you that the united states department of justice and local and state police forces are trying to enforce these laws as agress ily as possible. i think you need more resources and you need criminal background checks. so you can know how to keep these weapons, all weapons out of the hands who shouldn't have them, criminals, domestic abusers, the severe mentally ill. would you agree that the criminal background check expansion into priva
, a cut in naval forces. at $3 billion cut in the military's health care system. the pentagon could be restructuring contracts. what do you want to say about those areas? guest: training is of cuts where only units preparing to deploy or other places -- these are the ones that will be training. everyone else, primarily in the air force and the navy, their planes will be grounded because it will not have the money they would use to do the training. it will be shifted into the war accounts to pay for afghanistan. stuff like tricare, i believe you mentioned, that is more like the benefits for care and being seen by doctors and whatnot. >> there are lots of voices in washington. what should we know about the defensive area? guest: there are two sides. there is the side that says we need to cut federal spending and the defense needs to take a roll. a lot of them would agree with that. the problem is, we're halfway done with the year and they have not been preparing for this. they will up to squeeze this into a six-month period. if it is fully implemented, it will have an impact. 2014, if
. the pentagon now cutting the amount of persian gulf aircraft carriers from two to one and delaying the fueling to save money. >> and others are ramping up spending and senior fellow at the advanced studies, lt. colonel tony schaeffer joins us now. >> how are you. >> alisyn: doing well. three weeks from now, march 1st, if congress doesn't get its act together there are sweeping military cuts set to go in place and this, at the same time that we know that china and russia, in the face of two decades will outpace us with their military spending. what do you make of that? >> well, firstoff, we spend 40% of the world's budget on defense right now and i think what we have to do is fix our strategy first. one of the problems is, ali, we have had the same basic frame work since 1947 and 1947 with some adjustments in the 80's, we figure out the real threats. i always talk about the beginning with the end in mind and this is where we have an opportunity here, since we won the cold war, we're ending the wars in afghanistan and iraq, time to rethink how we focus what we do. we've noticed spending money on
's now responsible for sustainability. these reports are just coming from an office. deep in the pentagon or department of homeland security. these are deputy secretaries or assistant secretary at minimum level. as a result you get senior interested in these. the interesting day is the first set of these is a lot of exploring a better understanding of challenges within the big enterprise we have an beginning to put together strategies in the path we are headed. we are beginning to make great progress towards these goals. we're implementing strategy and dining areas that need to be addressed. the sustainability plans today look a little bit different than three years ago. if you're interested in finding them, there are performance stack of available for the public. >> is what way do they look different? >> they now are -- were not implementing strategies. if you look back, and they may have been trying things early on and now you're finding what works were also fighting we can take the strategies themselves and look at the department of transportation is doing really well in greenhouse gas
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)